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Commit 72d0e4df authored by jfschaefer's avatar jfschaefer

added molto example sentence with abstract grammar term

parent 71ae6ad5
......@@ -204,7 +204,7 @@ gets linearized in the following way:
\begin{lstlisting}[language=GF]
root = DefGenCNidx root_CN ;
\end{lstlisting}
\gfinline{DefGenCNidx} is defined in \texttt{resources/Math.gf} as
\gfinline{DefGenCNidx} is declared in \texttt{resources/Math.gf} as
\begin{lstlisting}[language=GF]
DefGenCNidx : CN -> MathObj -> MathIdx -> MathObj ;
\end{lstlisting}
......@@ -215,8 +215,13 @@ DefGenCNidx = \cn,obj,i ->
(modCN cn (mkAdv my_possess_Prep obj)) ;
\end{lstlisting}
Everything is brought together in \texttt{english/Arith1Eng.gf}. The word
\gfinline{root_CN} is defined in \texttt{english/LexiconEng.gf}.\ednote{MK: Make an
example phrase with \nlex{root} in it and show what the abstract grammar term is.}
\gfinline{root_CN} is defined in \texttt{english/LexiconEng.gf}.
For example, the English sentence
\nlex{it is not true that the tenth root of pi is an element of the empty set}
gets parsed into the following abstract grammar term:
\begin{lstlisting}[language=GF]
not (mkProp (set1_in (root nums1_pi ten) emptyset))
\end{lstlisting}
\section{Conclusion}\label{sec:concl}
\ednote{tbw.}
......
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